31 Days of Devotion, Days 23 & 24

Time to play catch up!  Looks like we missed Days 23 and 24 of 31 Days of Devotion.

Day 23: Share a quote, a poem, or piece of writing that you think resonates strongly with Antinous.

“What is dead may never die” is a common saying in the religion of the Drowned God on the Iron Islands in George R.R. Martin’s Song of Ice and Fire fantasy series, which many people know through the popular TV show Game of Thrones.  I’ve always thought that Martin’s depiction of the religion of the Drowned God was very interesting, and there are elements that always remind me of Antinous.  Particularly the way in which priests of the Drowned God are “ordained.”   They are drowned in the waters of the sea, and then brought back to life.  This is considered a type of death and resurrection, although some are never revived. This is also how Martin Depicts Euron being crowned as king of the Iron Islands.  It has always evoked that theme of Antinous drowning in the waters of the Nile, and then defeating death through deification.  However, the similarities with the fictional Drowned God in Song of Ice and Fire may end there.  The response to “What is dead may never die” is “But rises again harder and stronger.”  The nature of the rebirth after drowning in Martin’s series is much more focused on the sea bringing hardness and solemnness.  The inhabitants of the Iron Islands are warriors and conquerors.  They are a harsh people.  Antinous seems to have emerged from the waters of the Nile as a god who is much less warlike.  Indeed, we can see a linking of the idea of fertility to Antinous as he is syncretized with Osiris and given credit for a flood shortly after his death and deification that brought relief from a long drought.  However, regardless of the differences, Martin’s initial depiction of drowning and rebirth of the Drowned God in his novels always evoked the death and deification of Antinous.

 

 

Day 24: Share your own art, music, or writing about or for Antinous.

31 Hymns to Antinous

These 31 Hymns to Antinous were written by Merri-Todd Webster, one of our Magistrates,  as a devotional offering in May 2015. They are a wonderful little resource to prayer on a daily basis as you move through the month, or taken individually for use in personal devotions.  Since we’re a day late and should have shared this yesterday, the 24th, I’ll share HYMN XXIV:

To Antinous and Mantinoe

To Mantinoe, mother of Antinous, together with her son, the god,

let us give praise, for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the womb that bore him, a healthy son,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the breasts that nourished him with the milk of life,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the eyes that watched him with mindful care,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the mouth that kissed him and spoke his name, Antinoos,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the hands that prepared his meals and changed his diapers,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the hips that carried him before he could walk,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor the feet that walked for him and to him and with him,

for his mother’s whole body heals.

Let us honor her beauty, her strength, her wisdom, her care,

for like Semele she has been brought out of darkness and oblivion

by her devoted son to shine forever in the stern of the Boat of Millions of Years,

mother to the people of Antinous. Hail, Mantinoe! Hail, Antinous!

The semen of the gods is truly in his body, and his mother’s whole body heals!

 

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